The Life Changer Chapter 1: JAMB Text For 2022 (Download PDF)

If you are actually looking for the Summary, JAMB Likely Questions and Answers for The Life Changer Chapter 1 by Khadija Abubakar Jalli, tap the link below to read it.

Summary, JAMB most likely questions and answers for chapter 1

The Life Changer is the newly recommended novel for 2022/2023 JAMB exercise. After registering for JAMB, the things you get are:

  • A disk containing JAMB brochure and
  • The recommended text for the JAMB exercise.

Questions from this book come out under English language. It is compulsory for all the candidates no matter your field of study. So, every JAMB candidate is required to read it.

The questions differ from one candidate to another. So, you need to finish the book in order to get every detail of it.

Here in SCHOOLISLE, we understand that some people find it difficult to read using the hard copy. So, we decided to make easier for you. You can now read it here and also Download the PDF.

SEE ALSO

Settings in the Life Changer by Khadija Abubakar Jalli – JAMB Novel

Moral Lessons From The Life Changer – JAMB Novel

Tips to read and understand the book

  • While reading, get a book and write the characters in the book and their roles.
  • Also write down a remarkable comment or action by any character.
  • Make your jotting comprehensive. Write every single point.
  • Note the main character in the book.
  • Also note the protagonist and the antagonist.
  • Point out the subject matter (what the whole book is all about).
  • Get the storyline. Ensure you can narrate the story very well.
  • Concentrate as you read it.
  • Go back and read what you have written down.

Also Read: JAMB Form: Registration price and how to register

WAEC Government syllabus 2022

NECO Timetable for 2022

WAEC Exam has been postponed

Author of The Life Changer – JAMB Novel

BEFORE YOU START

Names of Characters and their Roles in “The Life Changer”.

JAMB Novel 2021 - The life Changer

The Life Changer – Chapter One

They were waiting for Daddy.
We were.
I paused outside their door.

The laughter was cheerful. It was also infectious. It began as a silent chuckle, then slowly it turned into a mirthful but stilted giggle. Now, it had finally transformed into a full-fledged chortle. I stopped awhile to listen. My plan was not to eavesdrop. God forbid that I should be that kind of mother who surreptitiously listened on her children’s private conversation. But there was something about the laughter that was compelling and arresting.

Bint, my five-year-old daughter, appeared to be the narrative voice. She was telling her two sisters the story of her classroom encounter with their meddlesome Social Studies teacher the previous week. The narration was so vivid you could actually visualize what transpired. The teacher believed he knew a little bit about every subject under the sun, especially French which most of the students found strange. Bint herself was new in the school.

French was an optional subject even at this level of primary school education. We however encouraged her to take the option since we believed that language acquisition at an early age came relatively easy and with minimal effort. And, in any case, French was second to English in the ranking of international languages, we reckoned.

So it was that the first question the teacher asked was, “Who can tell me how to say Good Morning in French?”

Everybody was silent in the classroom.

“You mean none of you knows how to say Good Morning
Hesitatingly, not without trepidation, Bint raised her hand.

“Yes?” he pointed at her.
Slowly, she stood up.
“What is your name?” the teacher asked. “My name is Bint.”

The Life Changer

“So, tell us, Bint, how do you say Good Morning in French?”

“Bonjour,” Bint said.

“That’s very good,” the teacher said, speaking English. “And how do you say that’s very good in French, teacher?” Bint asked innocently.

“What?” The teacher jerked his head off as if stung by a bee. Then, within a flash, he bolted out of the classroom only to come back a few minutes later with the French Mistress of the senior classes.

“Ask her,” he told Bint simply.

“How do you say that’s very good in French, Aunty?” Bint asked reverentially.

“C’est tres bien,” the French Mistress replied. “C’est tres bien,” Bint repeated confidently.

The class began clapping and laughing at the same time. The class teacher followed the French Mistress out and didn’t come back till after the break.

Meanwhile the whole class as one surrounded Bint and started clapping and singing going round her in cheer and joy. They seemed to have known instinctively that Bint was destined for bigger things. Who else but a genius would ask a question the teacher could not answer?.

“I got them. I really got them,” Bint was saying excitedly to her siblings. I found myself laughing silently. Before I got carried away, I let myself unobtrusively into the room. They were used to my impromptu barging. One reason I used to go in unannounced was to keep them on their toes where issues of personal hygiene were concerned. The second reason was that we were used to keeping each other company. These formed the rationale for my periodic checking of their room to ensure that they learned the basic norms of maintaining the cleanliness of their room at an early age and to get used to my presence. My own grandmother used to tell us when we were young that what you teach a child is like writing on a rock and when dried, it would be difficult to erase. I seldom miss an opportunity to make them see the lesson in an experience. They learned to respect my opinion over most of their matters and I tried not to be unnecessarily didactic when it came to correction or giving instructions. This cemented our mutual trust.

“I am so proud of you, Bint,” I said as I wedged myself between Bint and Jamila, her immediate elder sister. They were all seated by the edge of the bed and looked up at me as if my intrusion had all along been anticipated.

“Thank you, mummy.” Bint said as she nestled even closer to me. She was my last child and consequently the darling of the entire family. My first child was Omar. He was the first child and only male. Between Omar and Bint there is such great affinity that no one dared frown at her intransigence, no matter how great, if he was around.

And all of them called me mummy. They didn’t call me Mama, a title every child in my community used for their mother. They couldn’t call me Ummi, which was my name at home, which incidentally also meant mummy. It actually translated to My Mother in Arabic, because I was named after my paternal grandmother. So I was Ummi to everybody else, and Mummy to my children and their friends. Except Omar who insisted on calling me Mum. I was never particular about how I was addressed. What I always insisted was respect for each other, and for one another.

“Listen, young girls, all Mallam Salihu was trying to do was to practice his small French thereby trying to perfect it. You should give him a break. Moreover, he is humble enough to accept that he does not know. Another teacher would frown his face and tell you au revoir means welcome whether you like it or not. Your knowledge to the contrary would mean nothing to him.

“But au revoir means ‘goodbye until we meet again’, mummy.”

Bint was quick to point out.

“I know my dear, but if the teacher is angry he can tell you any word means whatever he wants it to mean.”

“That would not be fair.”

“It is also not fair to push your teachers beyond what they know.”

“They are the ones who act as if they know everything, mummy.” When our conversation got that animated, my children seemed to forget that I was also a teacher. I never bothered reminding them. The spontaneity of the discussion was what made it interesting. And if you attempted to interrupt, you would destroy the flow of the discussion.

Teemah, my second child, opened her mouth to say something and paused.

Just then, there was this loud knock on the door. Before he was asked to come in, Omar pushed open the door and jumped on me.

“I made it, mum, I made it!”

His sisters all stood up as one and began asking, “What did you make?”

“I made it to the university, dears. Bint, your big brother is a university student.”

They screamed and shouted and ululated.

The news came as a pleasant surprise to them. And especially to me. Nobody knew where Omar was going when he left home earlier that morning. To say the truth, he was looking rather anxious when he came to greet me in the morning. He was dressed in blue jeans and white shirt. His skin cut hair style contrasted beautifully with his side burns which he kept clean and trim. He had always been a precocious child. To look at him, you would think he was well into his twenties. But Omar was just eighteen. My singular thrill with Omar was that he was always decently dressed and clean. This pleased me beyond measure.

End Of Chapter one – JAMB Novel

Next Chapters

Read the Complete JAMB Novel here

Chapter 2: The Life Changer by Khadijat Abubakar Jalli

Chapter 3: The Life Changer by Khadijat Abubakar Jalli

Chapter 4: The Life Changer by Khadijat Abubakar Jalli

Check out:

How to score above 300 in JAMB

How to Get International Scholarships and Study Abroad

Secrets of passing any kind of exam

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *